Topic Eleven: Two-Dimensional Shapes and their Attributes

Pacing (Duration of Unit):

Desired Results

Transfer:
Standards for Mathematical Practices
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:

3.G.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of the subcategories.

3.G.2 Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.

Student I Can Statements:
  • I can use attributes to identify shapes.
  • I can use attributes to classify shapes into categories.
  • I can define quadrilaterals.
  • I can recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as being examples of quadrilaterals.
  • I can draw quadrilaterals other than rhombuses, rectangles, and squares.
  • I can partition shapes into equal parts.
  • I can explain any unit fraction as one part of a whole divided into equal parts.

Prerequisite Standards:
2.G.1 Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes such as a given number of angles or a give number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

2.G.2 Partition a rectangular into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.

2.G.3 Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, and a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.
Big Ideas:

Geometric Figures
Two and three dimensional objects with or without curved surfaces can be described, classified, and analyzed by their attributes. An object's location in space can be described quantitatively.

Practices, Processes, and Proficiencies
Mathematics content and practices can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:
  • How can two-dimensional shapes be described, analyzed, and classified?
Students will know...
  • Lines and line segments are set of points in space that can be used to describe parts of other geometric lines, shapes, and solids.
  • An angle is formed by two rays with a common endpoint. Angles can be classified by their size.
  • Plan shapes have many properties that make them different from one another.
  • Polygons can be described and classified by their sides and angles.
  • Polygons can be put together or taken apart to make other polygons.
  • Some problems can be solved by breaking apart or changing the problem into simpler ones, solving the simpler ones, and using those solutions to solve the original problem.
  • Commonalities in attributes of objects or situations can be found and used to make and test generalizations about relationships.

Vocabulary:
  • point
  • line, line segment, intersecting lines, parallel lines
  • ray
  • angle
  • vertex
  • right angle, perpendicular, acute angle, obtuse angle
  • polygon
  • side
  • diagonal
  • triangle
  • quadrilateral
  • pentagon, hexagon, octagon, decagon
  • equilateral
  • triangle, isosceles triangle, scalene triangle, right angle, acute triangle, obtuse triangle
  • trapezoid
  • parallelogram
  • rectangle
  • square
  • rhombus

Students will be skilled at...
  • identifying lines and line segments and explore their different relationships.
  • identifying and classifying angles in relation to right angles.
  • identifying and classifying polygons.
  • identifying and classifying triangles. identifying and classifying quadrilaterals.
  • creating new shapes by combining shapes or by separating shapes.
  • transforming shapes by cutting apart a shape and rearranging the pieces to create a new shape.
  • solving a problem by first solving a simpler problem.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Assessment:

Other Evidence:

Exit Ticket:




Formative Assessment:


Learning Plan

Learning Activities:

11-1 Lines and line segments are set of points in space that can be used to describe parts of other geometric lines, shapes, and solids.

11-2 An angle is formed by two rays with a common endpoint. Angles can be classified by their size.

11-3 Plan shapes have many properties that make them different from one another.

11-4 Plan shapes have many properties that make them different from one another.

11-5 Polygons can be described and classified by their sides and angles.

11-6 Polygons can be put together or taken apart to make other polygons.

11-7 Polygons can be put together or taken apart to make other polygons.

11-8 Some problems can be solved by breaking apart or changing the problem into simpler ones, solving the simpler ones, and using those solutions to solve the original problem.

11-9 Commonalities in attributes of objects or situations can be found and used to make and test generalizations about relationships.
Resources:

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