Topic One: Numeration

Pacing (Duration of Unit):

Desired Results

Transfer:

Standards for Mathematical Practices
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precisions.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:

3.NBT.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

3. NBT.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Student I Can Statements:
  • I can add within 1000 by using an algorithm or strategy based on place value.
  • I can subtract within a 1000 by using an algorithm or strategy based on place value.

Prerequisite Standards:

2.NBT.1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.


2.NBT.2 Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.


2.NBT.3 Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.


2.NBT.4 Compare two-three-digit numbers based on meaning of the hundred, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of the comparisons.
Big Ideas;

Base-Ten Numeration System
The base ten numeration system is a scheme for recording numbers using digits 0-9, groups of ten, and place value.

Number Uses, Classification, and Representation
Numbers can be used for different purposes, and numbers can be classified and represented in different ways.

Numbers and the Number Line
The set of real numbers is infinite and ordered. Whole numbers, integers, and fractions are real numbers. Each real number can be associated with a unique point on the number line.

Comparisons and Relationships
Numbers, expressions, measures, and objects can be compared and related to other numbers, expressions, measures, and objects in different ways.

Practices, Processes, and Proficiencies
Mathematics content and practices can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:
  • How are greater numbers read and written?
  • How can whole numbers be compared and ordered?
  • How does rounding help us make sense of numbers?
Students will be know...
  • Our number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever we get 10 in one place value, we move to the next greater place value.
  • Place value can be used to name numbers in different ways. Uses of [[#|numbers include]] telling how many and showing a date or an address.
  • the place value periods one, thousands, millions, and so forth, are used to read and write large numbers.
  • Each whole number can be associated with a unique point on the number line. Zero is the least whole number on the number line and there is no greatest number. The distance between any two consecutive whole numbers on a given number line is the same.
  • Equal distances on the number line must correspond to equal differences in the numbers. The scale on some graphs is a number line. Place value can be used to compare whole numbers.
  • Place value can be used to order whole numbers.
  • Some problems can be solved by generated a list of outcomes and organizing that list in a systematic way so all outcomes are accounted for.

Vocabulary:
  • digits
  • place value
  • standard form
  • expanded form
  • word form
  • period
  • compare
  • order

Students will be skilled at...

Reading and writing 3-digit and 4-digit numbers.
  • naming numbers in different ways.
  • reading and [[#|writing]] numbers, in the ten and hundred thousands.
  • locating and comparing whole numbers on a number line.
  • identifying the pattern on a number line, or graph scale, and calculate missing labels.
  • comparing 3-digit and 4-digit whole numbers.
  • ordering 3-digit and 4-digit whole numbers.
  • making an organized list to represent information given in a problem.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks:




Formative Assessments:





Writing Task:

Other Evidence:

Exit Tickets:







Learning Plan

Learning Activities:

1-1 Our number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever we get 10 in one place value, we move to the next greater place value.

1-2 Place value can be used to name numbers in different ways. Uses of numbers include telling how many and showing a date or an address.

1-3 The place value periods one, thousands, millions, and so forth, are used to read and write large numbers.

1-4 Each whole number can be associated with a unique point on the number line. Zero is the least whole number on the number line and there is no greatest number. The distance between any two consecutive whole numbers on a given number line is the same.

1-5 Equal distances on the number line must correspond to equal differences in the numbers. The scale on some graphs is a number line.

1-6 Place value can be used to compare whole numbers.

1-7 Place value can be used to order whole numbers.

1-8 Some problems can be solved by generated a list of outcomes and organizing that list in a systematic way so all outcomes are accounted for.
Resources:

Home School Connection:


Centers:





Online Games:
PBS Kids Estimation Contraption

Online Student Videos:
Learn Zillions Online Student Videos