Topic Sixteen: Data

Pacing (Duration of Unit):

Desired Results

Transfer:
Standards for Mathematical Practices
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:
3.MD.3 Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two- step "how many more: and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.

Student I Can Statements:
  • I can make a scaled picture graph or bar graph with several categories to represent data (e.g., one square or picture represents 5 objects).
  • I can read and interpret scaled bar graphs in order to solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems.

Prerequisite Standards:
2.MD.6 Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 and on a number line diagram.
2.MD.10 Draw a picture graph and a bar graph 9with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

3.NF.1 Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is portioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.

3.NF.2.b Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
Big Ideas:

Data Collection and Representation
Some questions can be answered by collecting and analyzing data, and the question to be answered determines the data that needs to be collected and how best to collect it. Data can be represented visually using tables, charts, graphs. The type of data determines the best choice of visual representation.

Practices, Processes, and Proficiencies
Mathematics content and practices can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:
  • Why does "what" we measure influence "how" we measure?
  • Why display data in different ways?
  • How can data be represented, interpreted, and analyzed?
Students will know...
  • Line plots allow data to be compared more easily than in a list or a table.
  • Line plots can be used to organize and represent data generated by measuring lengths.
  • Each type of graph is most appropriate for certain kinds of data. Pictographs and bar graphs help to compare data.
  • The key for a pictograph determines the number of pictures needed to represent each number in a set of data.
  • In a bar graph, the scale determines how long the bar needs to be to represent each number in a set of data.
  • Some problems can be solved by making reading, and analyzing a graph.

Vocabulary:
line plot
pictograph
key
bar graph
scale

Students will be skilled at...
  • organizing the results of an experiment using a line plot.
  • generating data by measuring lengths to the nearest fourth of an inch, creating line plots to organize their data, and drawing conclusions from the their line plot.
  • reading and interpreting data from a pictograph and a bar graph.
  • organizing data in a pictograph from a table or tally chart.
  • organizing data in a bar graph from a table or tally chart.
  • solving problems by using tables and graphs to draw conclusions.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Assessment:



Tasks Adapted from Smarter Balance and/or PARCC Assessment Sample Tasks
These tasks are adapted from authentic Smarter Balance/PARCC Sample Tasks.


Other Evidence:

Formative Assessment Task:






Learning Plan

Learning Activities:

16-1 Line plots allow data to be compared more easily than in a list or a table.

16-2 Line plots can be used to organize and represent data generated by measuring lengths.

16-3 Each type of graph is most appropriate for certain kinds of data. Pictographs and bar graphs help to compare data.

16-4 The key for a pictograph determines the number of pictures needed to represent each number in a set of data.

16-5 In a bar graph, the scale determines how long the bar needs to be to represent each number in a set of data.

16-6 Some problems can be solved by making reading, and analyzing a graph.
Resources:

Home School Connection:


Student Activities: